How Big Is Home Field Advantage? Part Three (by JonathanF)

So… if travel doesn’t seem to do much, what about teams? Once we go to teams, we can no longer just look at home and road winning percentages, since those will depend greatly on how good the team was. Instead, we now switch to home-road splits: winning percentage at home minus winning percentage on the … Continue reading “How Big Is Home Field Advantage? Part Three (by JonathanF)”

How Big Is Home Field Advantage? Part Two (by JonathanF)

So what does the home field advantage in baseball look like? In my database of almost exactly 200,000 baseball games which didn’t end in ties, the home team won 54.7 percent. But road teams did really badly in the early days of baseball. Before 1900, the home team won 59.1 percent. Post WWII, only one … Continue reading “How Big Is Home Field Advantage? Part Two (by JonathanF)”

Some Evidence of a Greenie Effect (by JonathanF)

So some colleagues were discussing PEDs and the HOF, a topic which really doesn’t interest me much at all. (I say let ‘em in.) The inevitable amphetamine argument was broached, you know, Mantle used greenies, what’s the difference? This got one of my more quantitative colleagues to try and figure out if one could estimate … Continue reading “Some Evidence of a Greenie Effect (by JonathanF)”

How Big is Home Field Advantage? Intro (by JonathanF)

Alex has asked me to do something that scares me a little bit. So I’m going to try it. I am troubled by the size of the home field advantage in baseball — it seems way too small. So I’m going to do a study, but Alex wants me to do it in public at … Continue reading “How Big is Home Field Advantage? Intro (by JonathanF)”

Player statistical goals for 2011

Not a big year for players seeking big round numbers or moving up career lists. Of course, the Braves are a very young team now. Chipper‘s pretty much settled his spot on the Braves leaderboards — second all-time in most things to the uncatchable Aaron, first in walks, first on most of the Atlanta-only lists. … Continue reading “Player statistical goals for 2011”

Official WAG thread

Okay, make your projections/guesses for player numbers in 2011 here. We will then look back and laugh at you at the end of the season. Here are mine: Dan Uggla: .265/.350/.530 Chipper Jones: 110 G, .280/.420/.420 Jason Heyward: 145 G, .300/.410/.620 Martin Prado: .307/.350/.410 (or what he always does) Brian McCann: .290/.390/.510 Alex Gonzalez: .250/.290/.420

Weird seasons: 1974, plus game thread: May 23, Braves at Pirates

1974 Atlanta Braves Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics – Baseball-Reference.com. Since the Pirates are almost totally uninteresting, I figured I’d talk about something else. First, here’s a video. While checking Henry Aaron’s stats for the season he broke the home run record, I noticed how out of context that season was for the Braves of … Continue reading “Weird seasons: 1974, plus game thread: May 23, Braves at Pirates”

Player career statistical goals for 2010

I always like to look through these things, to see what career marks a player can set for the season. Chipper Jones keeps moving up. He’s 94 hits shy of 2500, 55 RBI and 52 runs short of 1500, and even eight stolen bases short of 150, though that looks more like two years’ worth … Continue reading “Player career statistical goals for 2010”

The ineffable meaninglessness of spring training stats

Atlanta Braves Stats — Sortable Statistics | braves.com: Stats. I’ve said this before, but not this year, so here goes… Spring training statistics are nearly worthless. First, the sample sizes are so small — the Melky leads the Braves with 34 AB, Hudson with 14 innings — that the whole of spring training is maybe … Continue reading “The ineffable meaninglessness of spring training stats”

Interlude: Bobby’s bullpen management

I’ve gone through the bullpen mainstays, and I’m really not up to tackling Manny Acosta right now. So let’s talk bullpen management. Last year (this stat is from the Bill James Handbook) Bobby was the manager most likely to use a pitcher on consecutive days. I think we all knew that, instinctively, but it’s been … Continue reading “Interlude: Bobby’s bullpen management”